| by
Ed Mierzwinski
Senior Director, Federal Consumer Program

I’ve been reading the CFPB’s mail. It’s okay, you can too. It’s public. Not surprisingly, the latest CFPB consumer complaints paint a grim picture of the pandemic’s effect on family finances. I ask: Why isn’t the CFPB doing more to help struggling consumers?

Mortgage servicers failed Americans during the last recession. And if early data from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is any indication, history may well be on its way to repeating.

 | by
Mike Litt
Director, Campaign to Defend the Consumer Bureau

Most airlines are only offering vouchers, not refunds, when passengers cancel their flights due to concerns about COVID-19.

As manufacturers block access to manuals and other fix-it information, biomedical repair technicians press for reform.

Tens of millions of Americans with mortgages have been put in a tough spot by the coronavirus crisis. Many more consumers will likely seek forbearance or loan modifications in the weeks and months ahead.

New federal limits on surprise medical bills protect some patients with COVID-19, but surprise bills are a problem for all patients. We call for a comprehensive solution to surprise billing.

Americans are eager to move beyond the shelter-in-place phase of the coronavirus response. But many are still anxious about safety. Public health leaders have laid out our next steps. State and local officials should follow the experts’ advice. The federal government should ensure that they’re able to.

 | by
Ed Mierzwinski
Senior Director, Federal Consumer Program

This blog explains U.S. PIRG's support for automated warning and contact tracing, subject to appropriate privacy and civil liberties protections, which can provide critical information quickly about who has potentially been exposed.

A guest blog from my colleague, Lisa Frank, from our grants team, sharing her story of testing for coronavirus.

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is an emergency for our democracy. If we don’t take decisive action now, we could end up with Wisconsin-like nightmares across the country come November -- with voters forced to make a lose-lose decision between their health and participating in democracy. To avoid that worst-case scenario, our number one priority right now should be expanding access to the most workable solution to this crisis: vote by mail.