PIRG backs Get the Lead Out Act to protect children's health

Replacing the nation's lead service lines would protect children from lead exposure.

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Henry Hintermeister
Creative Associate

Author: Henry Hintermeister

Creative Associate

 

Started on staff: 2019
B.A., magna cum laude, Tufts University

Henry grew up in southern Maine, where he developed his love for hiking, kayaking and track & field. He currently lives in Somerville, Massachusetts, with his girlfriend and enjoys getting together with family, reading fiction, listening to NPR and playing soccer.

Lead still contaminates drinking water in thousands of communities across America, and the single worst source of that contamination are lead service lines.

On May 19, federal lawmakers introduced the bipartisan Get the Lead Out Act, a bill that would set aside $46.5 billion to replace the approximately 9 million lead service lines still in use today. The bill's 2031 deadline for replacing the pipes would drastically accelerate the sluggish pace of current efforts.

Replacing the nation's lead service lines would protect children from lead exposure, which is especially damaging to kids' health.

“Now is the time to act decisively," said Matt Cassale, PIRG's director of Environment Campaigns. "Congress should pass this bill swiftly — either on its own or as part of a major infrastructure package this year.”

U.S. PIRG commended U.S. Reps. Chris Smith (N.J.), a Republican, and Henry Cuellar (Tex.), a Democrat, who introduced the legislation.

Read more.

Read about our work to get the lead out. 

Photo: The bipartisan Get the Lead Out Act would replace the nation's lead service lines by 2031. Credit: IntangibleArts via Wikimedia Commons, CC BY 2.0

Henry Hintermeister
Creative Associate

Author: Henry Hintermeister

Creative Associate

 

Started on staff: 2019
B.A., magna cum laude, Tufts University

Henry grew up in southern Maine, where he developed his love for hiking, kayaking and track & field. He currently lives in Somerville, Massachusetts, with his girlfriend and enjoys getting together with family, reading fiction, listening to NPR and playing soccer.